Politics, Visualized

Photo of President Barack Obama & Congressional Leaders

President Barack Obama & Congressional Leaders

THE BIPARTISAN COMPROMISE

The White House

Debt limit increased by at least $2.1 trillion.

10-year spending cuts of nearly $1 trillion

Bipartisan committee is tasked with identifying an additional $1.5 trillion in deficit reduction.

THOUGHT: No, I’m not intentionally trying to depress you nor am I going all political on you. 

I include these numbers in today’s Daily Numbers simply because they are included in an infographic published by…The White House.

What I find fascinating is the fact that the White House is using the infographic format to distribute policy information. It’s a very smart idea, especially when it comes to public policy that can often be complex, convoluted, and hard to understand. 

From what I can tell, the White House began using infographics early last month with one detailing the resurgence of the American auto industry.

This is the first I’ve seen infographics employed as a tool to communicate public policy information. I have seen them used in overtly partisan contexts but those have typically been done by issue advocates of one stripe or another and with varying degrees of success.

Given the reach of the White House, and more importantly, the fact that it has the full attention of the political class, I expect we’ll see plenty of politically-oriented infographics during this presidential election season. 

Prepare yourself for the Attack of the Infographics, with Swift-boat style partisan visual assaults. 

WATCH an Infographics screencast I did about why I think the phenomenon has taken off. 

 

THROWBACK THURSDAY: WATCH NASA’s 1970s-era vision of colonizing space. 

 

Thank you for Jeane Blomme

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About David Erickson

David Erickson is principal of e-Strategy Media, a digital marketing consultancy based in Minnesota. David has extensive experience in digital marketing and is often used as an expert source by media and asked to speak on the topic before organizations and to sit on panel discussions.