Lifetouch Has The Right Touch On Its About Page

Do you remember picture day? The day at school that everybody got their picture taken?

Stacia Brown wrote in the Washington Post about the day:

The picture day tradition dates back to the early 20th century. Though class photographs date back much further, companies such as Lifetouch and Olan Mills, which remain core suppliers of school photography today, were founded in the 1930s. From then until as recently as 18 years ago (when I was a senior in high school and smartphones were still the stuff of fantasy), school pictures were a tangible form of social currency. We distributing them like calling cards, our signatures and messages to friends and family scrawled on the back. They were also a class marker; we could only afford to distribute them freely to classmates if our parents could afford the deluxe package with a ton of wallet-size prints. And, of course, the pressure to look one’s best in a school portrait was compounded by the knowledge that the photo wasn’t just for fun exchanges with friends; it would also be published. School pictures were the defining public record of our appearance for the entire academic year during which they were taken.

LifeTouch is a Minnesota company, originally called National School Studios. But they’re called LifeTouch now and based in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, which is a hop, skip, and a jump away from where I live.

I came across their website doing some research and noticed the company’s About section.

They have, as most companies do, a page devoted to their executive leadership.

Again, the company offers professional photography services. They do all the school photos for your Picture Day. They publish yearbooks. They do JC Penney Portrait Studios.

But they’ve got this leadership page where they have photos of all their executive leadership: Their president, vice president of marketing, blah blah blah. Their executive team; there’s photos of them.

But accompanying those photos is a little insert of their original school photo from, like, grade school. Just brilliant; brilliantly done executive leadership page. On brand, absolutely; and very charming as well.

Screenshot: Lifetouch About Page

We think of content marketing primarily in the context of the written word but we need to pay as much attention to the details of our visual communications as we do the story we tell through prose.

The Lifetouch example is a perfect illustration of just how to do that.

More About Page Goodness